Expert Advice on How the Transfer Process Works

How the transfer process works


Making your home at a new college or university can be an intimidating task. Dozens of questions about the transfer process fill your mind, and you’re not exactly sure what to do. Not to fear: expert advice is here to help. Kelly Frank, associate director of admission and transfer counselor at the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio, answers the questions you have.

Q. What are the general steps involved in the transfer process?

A. To be considered for admission, students should first send in their transfer applications. Second, they should have their high school and college transcripts sent to the college to which they’re applying. Once they’ve completed those steps, an evaluation of previous credit, along with the admission decision, is made and provided to them.

Q. How early should transfer students begin the process of applying to their school of choice?

A. If students wish to attend classes during the winter semester, they should begin the application process in October. To begin in the fall semester, they should start the process in January.

Q. Typically, how does a student’s GPA transfer to a new university?

A. Grade point average does not transfer. Students must begin their academic careers with a 0.0 GPA.

Q. What are some resources students can use to determine which of their credits will transfer?

A. Sending in a transcript for review by the appropriate department faculty members or admissions advisors is the fastest way to get the answers. Course check sheets, often available in each dean’s office, are helpful resources. Students should visit their university’s Web site for information on credit transfer. 

Q. What are some common mistakes you see transfer students make during their transition? How can these be avoided?

A. Applying too late, missing deadlines, and sending transcripts to the wrong office are common mistakes. Students can avoid these pitfalls by contacting the transfer admissions representative at their university to obtain deadline information and proper application guidelines.

Take the Credit

Meeting with your academic counselors or advisors at the new university you’ll attend is a crucial step in the transfer process. Perhaps the most important subject you’ll discuss is credit transfer. Follow these guidelines to save time and to be sure the course credit you’ve earned will carry over to your new institution.

  • Get in touch with the transfer student advisor to find out what types of course credits will transfer. If possible, ask the appropriate authority at the university to preapprove courses you plan to take for credit transfer.
  • Contact the school you’ll attend to find out what its transfer policy is. Some schools will accept only credits for classes similar to those they offer. Others set a limit to the number of transfer credit hours they’ll allow.
  • Generally, universities require that you obtain at least a C in a class in order for the credit hours to transfer. Grade policies differ among institutions, so be sure to ask.
  • Research whether your community college has an articulation agreement or a collaborative agreement with the university you’d like to attend. Articulation agreements outline specific courses a university will accept from a two-year institution and guarantee admission once the two-year curriculum has been completed. Collaborative agreements may not guarantee admission but will designate courses the school will accept as transfer of credit.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

This article was written by Hannah Purnell

Hannah Purnell is a staff writer for CollegeView.com. Hannah writes extensively on the topic of undergraduate studies and the college search process.

9 Comments

  1. Karen

    Hi. I had a question on how many colleges you can apply to as a transfer student? I am considering two colleges.

    Thank You.

  2. Linda

    I have an associates in Paralegal as of 2003. Im wondering is there a certain time limit that I would be able to transfer over my credits or has that time expired. I heard after 10 yrs your unable to transfer over credits?

  3. Christine

    Hi, I wanted to know if colleges will look at the specific courses you took as in the degree of difficulty. Do they want to see that you’re taking all the hard classes?

  4. Paul

    I am looking to transfer out of Wagner College in Staten Ilsand. I was lied to about a athletic scholarship for football and other small details. I am currently looking now to transfer closter to home and because of these obstacles my academics has suffered the first semester. Now, I am transfering out the first semester and was already accepted at multiple colleges only having to pay between 5-7 thousand a year. Now will my first semester grades come back to affect this?

  5. Kavon

    Can you transfer before your second semester of your Freshman year or do you have to wait untill the end of the year.

    Thankyou.

  6. Natalie

    I finished my first semester at college, and decided to withdraw, a week into the second. I missed out on the Spring semester at other schools and am not sure what to do. I know I am considered a transfer student, but am still confused. Do I still send my SAT and high school transcript?…

  7. Emalee

    I’m a junior in college and am looking to transfer, do I still need to get my high school transcript? And for how long do they have that on file?

  8. Denise J Hoopes

    How do I get my transcripts transferred to N.C.???

  9. s.thomas

    how do u transfer what is deadline what financial ain n schlorships can u get

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