AP Courses

How Advanced Placement courses can help benefit you in your college career


Advanced Placement courses (AP) can save you both time and money. They can also give you a lead in the application pool in some of today’s highly selective colleges and universities.

The national AP program is administered by The College Board. AP classes are taught at more advanced levels than normal high school classes. When taught well, they are as challenging as many freshmen-level college classes.

At the end of an AP class you can choose to take the AP Exam which is administered across the country in May. The exam is difficult, but if your AP class has been taught well and you have earned an A or B in the class, you should be fairly well prepared to take the exam. The AP exam also gives you a chance to earn college credit.

The AP Exams are scored on a scale from one to five, with a score of five being the highest. Each college or university determines if they will accept AP credit and, if so, what score you will need.

Once you’ve decided to take an AP class, it’s easy to enroll. You can schedule a meeting with an AP teacher or the AP coordinator at your school about the course you are interested in taking. At this meeting be sure to discuss the workload and any preparation you might need to take before the course begins.

If you are a home-schooled student or attend a school that doesn’t offer AP courses, you can still participate in the program. Each year, hundreds of students participate through independent study. Some states also sponsor online courses.

AP courses allow you to explore the world from a variety of perspectives and to study subjects in greater depth and detail. Not only will you improve upon your academic skills, but you will develop the study habits necessary for tackling demanding coursework.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

This article was written by Melissa Borowski Dronberger

Melissa Borowski Dronberger is a former staff editor for CollegeView.com. Melissa writes extensively on the topic of undergraduate studies and the college search process.

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